We had the chance to speak with Danish singer-songwriter Soleima whose hypnotic tracks are bound to make you a fan. Soleima’s latest song “Low Life” is out now on Big Beat Records.

Tell us a little about yourself:
My name is Sarah; when I make music I am “Soleima.” I am from the Northern part of Jutland in Denmark, which is actually where my artist name comes from as well. It is something fathers tend to call their daughters when they are being a bit too cheeky, or do something they aren’t supposed to. I was called that a lot as a child! 🙂

How would you describe your music style?
My producer Vasco defines our music as ‘Garage Pop.’ I kind of like that – it is electronic pop music with a lot of organic elements to it.

What was the story behind “Low Life”?
“Low Life” was written for someone very close to me. He/she is struggling with difficulties in life, yet still fighting to get to a better place down the line. I admire that so much – the ability to keep forging ahead for something good in life, even though everything seems dark.

What was the creative inspiration for the music video?
We wanted to do something with long takes, and not worry too much about whether people would get bored… to make an artistic video not focusing on the entertainment value that much.

What elements of the music video for “Low Life” stand out to you in particular?
I like the symbolism of the video. Driving around in loops never going anywhere, or walking and walking never getting anywhere.

Photo by Dennis Morton

I think it is very important to be political right now. I think we all have an obligation to have some sort of political and global awareness. Be aware of the different power structures in the world, our own positions in it, and so on.

Your music has been called “political pop.” How do you address societal issues in your music?
I am actually very honored about that! I don’t intend to be directly political in my lyrics, but these days it is very difficult not to be. What interested me a lot on my first EP, and in general when writing this last year, is escapism. I think that is something many people are thinking about and dealing with these days. In a world that seems to be falling apart in many ways, this is something very appealing, yet also seems to be very forbidden and cowardly to me. The ambiguity in this I guess you could call political. I think it is very important to be political right now. I think we all have an obligation to have some sort of political and global awareness. Be aware of the different power structures in the world, our own positions in it, and so on. I don’t think art necessarily must be directly political. But I often find that good art is political. Indeed I think that if we are able to decode it in the right way, much of pop music is actually political in a very subtle way. The power of art is often that it doesn’t have to be theological or scientific, nor does it have to be political, yet it often is.

With the current political climate, what issues do you specifically think are important to highlight?
Uhhh, many things! A very important thing in my view is our understanding of borders and nation-states. It is a very postcolonialistic way of thinking of the world and I believe that we have to start there. We should see each other as global people, not as belonging to one nation.

 

INTERVIEW ANNA ZHANG
COVER PHOTO NICOLAI LEVIN

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